12 January, 2016

Buttermilk scones

Another one of my favourite scones recipes from Taste.com.au. This is simple and delicious at the same time. This is a very good recipe to make, when you have a lot of butter milk left after making butter, if you make butter at home that is. I do make my own butter very often, especially when I bake sourdough breads. For me, homemade butter is the best specially due to the fact that, you can infuse it with different flavours like herbs.

buttermilk scones

If you are planning on using left over buttermilk, make sure to separate it carefully. Do not let water get mixed in as it will thin out the texture. I used store bought buttermilk for this recipe today. I had a carton bought for a cake, and this is what I did to use up the rest of the buttermilk. Notice the store bought buttermilk is much thicker, than traditional buttermilk. It is fermented milk and packed for the cooking purposes, and hence is much thicker.

buttermilk scones

The tartness of the buttermilk adds flavour to the scones, and to enhancing that, I’m adding lemon zest as well. But it is completely optional.

If you don’t have self-rising flour, just add 1 teaspoon of baking powder to every 3/4 cup of flour and a pinch of salt.

buttermilk scones

The most important thing about making scones is the kneading. By that I mean not kneading too much. The dry ingredients are mixed lightly with the liquids, just until everything comes together. Use fold and press technique rather than pulling and stretching. If you knead the dough too much, that will result in tough and dense scones rather than light, airy and flaky.

buttermilk scones

It is always a good idea to let the dough rest before rolling out and cutting, so the gluten relaxes. When rolling, again, be careful not to work too much. Just lightly press the dough using the back of your fingers. If the dough is elastic, probably it’s been handled too much and let it rest for a while.

Arrange the scones touching one another in the tray, so that they bake evenly and rise upwards rather than sideways. It’s quite satisfying to tear off a scone from the bunch. This also prevent them from getting dried out too fast.

buttermilk scones

These can be served with fresh whipped cream and your favourite jam. I served these scones with dollop and some homemade dried fig jam. It is such a delicious combination. Fig jam is not too sweet so you can lather a generous amount. I love the crunchy, nutty texture of the fig jam.

Hope you’ll enjoy!

Buttermilk scones
Yields 18
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
40 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
40 min
Ingredients
  1. 3 1/2 cups self-rising flour
  2. 2 tablespoons caster sugar
  3. 60g butter, cubed
  4. 1 1/2 cups buttermilk
  5. Zest of half a lemon
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 220 °C. Prepare a pan greased and dusted with flour.
  2. Rub lemon zest in to sugar.
  3. Place flour in a big bowl with sugar and give a quick mix.
  4. Add the cold butter and rub in to flour using fingers, until it represents breadcrumbs.
  5. Add the buttermilk and mix with a spoon or hand until just combined.
  6. Place the dough on to a floured surface and fold and press lightly until dough comes together.
  7. Roll on a floured surface to 3.5 cm thickness and cut shapes using a cutter.
  8. Place on the prepared tray and bake for 20 minutes or until tops become light golden brown.
  9. Cool on a wire rack.
  10. Serve with jam and cream.
Notes
  1. Refrigerate in a plastic bag for up to a week
Adapted from Taste.com.au
Adapted from Taste.com.au
Voddy's Kitchen http://voddyskitchen.com.au/

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